Vancouver-based artist James Kerr gives us the renaissance of the renaissance. He virtually sneaks into museums to revive masterpieces by adding, well, funny stuff. Some might find this disrespectful to the intentions of the old masters. We rather think he channels their true intentions and updates them for the 21 century! Thank you, James Kerr!

Where do you come from?

Montréal, Canada.

When did you know, you wanted to become a professional creative?

Haha, I still don't know if I want to be a professional creative.

I thought I'd finally give animation a shot seeing as it was something I've wanted to do since I was a kid. Once I started fiddling with making animated GIFs, I was hooked.

How did you get into illustration/animation?

It was a really long, depressing winter, I was unemployed, and dying to get into a new art project. I thought I'd finally give animation a shot seeing as it was something I've wanted to do since I was a kid. Once I started fiddling with making animated GIFs, I was hooked.

You rearrange and repurpose classic art. How did you get the idea?

When I first started making GIFs in 2012, the plan was to make one everyday for a year. I didn't have any real direction to the project, grabbing images from anywhere. On one of my image searches, I fell upon a painting by Giotto and animated it. It was so much fun, and I just kept going back to work from that era. In the end, I love those paintings so much.

Could you imagine to broaden the narrative approach of your work or are you fine with the "short stories"?

I've thought about making longer format animations, and have worked on some stuff that plays out longer than a minute (an eternity), but the way the Scorpion Dagger project acts is somewhat a diary of all my silly thoughts about myself and the world. I really love that I'm able to jump from subject to subject, and not get bogged down with the same idea for too long.